I’m excited about technology again

For the first time in a long time (several years), I’m actually excited by the state of consumer technology. This includes both things that are currently available, as well as products that will (hopefully) come out in the near future. And what’s even better, there are actually a lot of such things I’m excited about.

First off: USB-C all the things. My phone is charged by USB-C, so are my headphones, and my tablet. The only holdovers are my Kindle Voyage, which needs to be charged very infrequently, and my laptop (which we will get to in a bit). Be aware though, not all USB-C cables are made the same. Beyond the obvious physical utility of just needing just one kind of connector, USB-C enables other little conveniences. Being able to carry around a single charger (or battery) that can charge all my devices, at high speed (due to high wattage), makes being on the go much more convenient. Furthermore, the Thunderbolt 3 data connection standard uses the same physical format as USB-C. That means it’s actually possible to plug a single cable into a laptop (or tablet) and have it charge and connect to peripherals like external monitors, speakers, input devices, external GPUs and storage at the same time, and at very high speeds (possibly with a Thunderbolt 3 dock in the middle).

Perhaps the only thing better than having one kind of connector, is having no connector at all. I’m not an audiophile, so most of the time I perfectly happy with Bluetooth noise-cancelling headphones, especially on long flights (that I am doing more of these days). And while Bluetooth keyboards and mice have been around for a while, we now have decent, semi-portable mechanical Bluetooth keyboards. I’m looking forward to having both wireless data and power in the not-too-distant future, but till then, I can deal with plugging in my things overnight (or every couple nights for most of them) and being untethered the rest of the time.

On the subject of keyboards, I got into mechanical keyboards a few years. The mechanical keyboard market seems to have expanded greatly in the last few years, with innovation in switches, layouts, keycaps, programmability and design. I can’t justify owning more than two (one for work and work from home), but I’m happy to see that there’s something for everybody.

Next: monitors. A 4K resolution at 27″ is absolutely beautiful. I run mine with resolution scaling, which means that every “digital” pixel is mapped to 4 physical pixels on the screen. And that means that text is super crisp. As someone who mostly deals with text, and loves fonts and typography, the experience is wonderful. A lot of 4K monitors can also double up as USB-C hubs, which means one less adapter or connection to worry about.

My current phone is the Pixel 3a, which I think is the best product Google has made in long time. It’s relatively cheap (especially on Black Friday), has decent specs, a clean, straight-from-Google version of Android, and a great camera. The battery currently lasts almost two full days for my moderate usage, which is good for my peace of mind. I don’t super-like the plastic (I’m sorry, polycarbonate) body, but it’s just fine for the price. I’m hoping the multiple cameras from the Pixel 4 come to a future Pixel 4a. It not, I see myself being happy with the 3a for a long time.

Finally, computers, by which I mean both tablets and laptops. Let’s start with the iPad. I have the 11″ iPad Pro from last year. It’s the closest that Apple has come to realizing the device’s potential (though it’s not quite there yet). The stylus is magnetically attached to the side and is charged that way as well. The iPad is USB-C, not Lightning (thankfully),the bezels are slim and uniform, the screen is beautiful and the battery lasts for days. The ARM-based processor in it is very powerful, but since I mostly use it to read and mark up, it’s not something that makes a big difference for me. The software however, still leaves much to be desired. I would love to use it for programming, but I can’t stand the thought of doing that straitjacketed into siloed apps.

On the subject of things Apple is doing right, I hear the new 16″ MacBook Pro is very good. I’m rather proud to say that I’m still using a 13″ MacBook Pro from 2015 (with a battery replacement), but I’m hoping that the improvements of the 16″ are brought to a 13″ or 14″ model in the near future. USB-C, Thunderbolt 3, a top-of-the-line processor, lots of fast memory, an ample SSD, a big trackpad, and a not-terrible keyboard. I will be sad to give up Magsafe, but it’s a price worth paying.

All that being said, the computing devices I find the most exciting are actually Microsoft’s Surface line. The Surface laptops look great, especially in black. The Surface Pro might be the best “ultra-portable” machine on the market, especially for business users. And finally, the Surface Pro X with its ARM processor and LTE chip could be a very interesting device for developers and users alike, assuming Microsoft can provide the developer support it really needs. The only downside is that none of them support Thunderbolt 3 at the moment. Maybe next year?

Most of what I’ve talked about, is on the market right now. As for the future, I am looking forward to more interesting ARM-based devices, and the software support to make proper use of them. A Surface Pro X that can be used to both develop and run ARM applications, and supports Thunderbolt 3, would be an almost perfect portable device. More realistically, a 13″ MacBook Pro is likely in the next few months, which means I can finally upgrade in peace.

And on a final aesthetic note, matte black all the things, except for the MacBook (and no, Space Gray doesn’t cut it).