Continuing yesterday’s theme of reducing consumption and information hygiene, today I thought about browsers and tabs. I’ve been pretty disappointed with how much webapps have taken over day-to-day computing. But the one silver lining is that I can isolate all of my communication (email, various messengers, Slack, social media) in the Chrome browser. When I need to focus, or just don’t want to be available, I simply close Chrome. I use Safari for all of my actual browsing. I suppose I could do this within different instances or windows of the same browser, but there is probably an important psychological signal I send myself by having different applications for different purposes (even if the two look substantially the same).

Another piece of the puzzle is that I aggressively close tabs. If I come across a long article that I want to read, but not at that moment, I send it to Instapaper (and will often actually read on my iPad). PDFs get downloaded, and also are often read on my iPad. For things that I will need to refer back to later I use bookmarks. I’ll use local bookmarks for things I need periodically (like API docs, or the list of LaTeX symbols). For other things that I might need later, I’ve been using a happy Pinboard user for years.

Personally if I have a browser window or too many tabs open I feel like that’s something I should be paying attention to, especially if it’s something like email or Slack. But most of the time, what I should be paying attention to is something completely different. Actually closing out unnecessary windows and tabs helps me to mentally clear out false expectations and distractions.

Over the last few months (years?) I’ve been noticing the increasingly deleterious effect of excessive information consumption of my state-of-mind in general and my ability to concentrate for long periods of time in particular.

With that in mind (get it? I’m sorry) I’m trying to be more careful about my information consumption.  Part of that is trying to consume higher quality things in smaller quantities, and spending more time and effort enjoying and appreciating what I’m experiencing. But part of it is also revisiting things that I really enjoyed once.

Over the last few years I’ve been largely listening to music via Spotify. While it’s been great for discovering new artists and music without spending tons of money, it’s also led to some bad habits. I often get lazy and listen the same playlist of Spotify-curated tracks on repeat. I also neglect my fairly large personal collection of music that’s sitting around on my computer.

So I’m going to try to listen to more music from my personal, local collection, including a bunch of the aforementioned things I used to really enjoy.  Since I’m near my MacBook most of time, I’ll be listening to MP3s via iTunes. Some of my collection is messy, so I’ll be using the excellent Beets tool to clean up and organize my collection as I go. Today I’m listening to Blind Guardian, starting with The Forgotten Tales album. I’ll also be keeping a Twitter thread of things I’m listening to as I go along (if I can remember to update it).

Web interfaces for source control

I came across two articles about web-based interfaces for source control. The first is a critique of GitHub’s UI. The second is an explanation of some of the design choices for Sourcehut, a new 100% free and open source software forge.

If you’re interested in interfaces, or software engineering tools, I highly recommend reading both. They are short, will only take a few minutes of your time, and maybe make you think about functionality you take for granted, or issues you’ve learned to ignore and live with.

Personally, I like GitHub’s general prettiness, but I agree that there’s a lot of unnecessary UI elements, and not enough of (what I would consider) key features for effectively browsing source. The above-linked article mentions the difficulty of switching between individual files, history and branches, while links to Enterprise pricing, or starring repos are on every page. Part of that can be chalked up to GitHub’s position in between a software forge and a social network (because  we’re still in the phase where we think everything needs to be a social network).

To be fair, Sourcehut is a bit too spartan for my tastes. If nothing else, I like good use of whitespace and nice fonts. (Aside: consider using Fira Code or Triplicate for displaying source code.) And I can’t tell how to easily move between code and history views on Sourcehut either. But at least its motivations are more clear, the appearance issues can probably be solved using user style sheets, and if you’re really peeved about its choices, you can fork it (though it’s almost certainly not worth the effort).

I haven’t really used similar tools (except for a pretty barebones code diff and review tool at a company I worked at briefly), so I wonder if there are other examples that can provide interesting lessons.