I’ve been reading The Way of Life by Lao Tzu, translated by Witter Bynner. A paragraph from the introduction struck me as relevant to our current times.

Maurer is right than democracy cannot be a successful general practice unless it is first a true individual conviction. Many of us in the West think ourselves believers in democracy if we can point to one of its fading flowers even while the root of it in our own lives is gone with worms. No one in history has shown better than Laotzu how to keep the root of democracy clean. Not only democracy but all of life, he points out grows at one’s own doorstep.

I sincerely hope that all of us can find ways to clean the root of democracy in our own lives.

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Sunday Selection 2018-08-12

Spotify CEO Daniel Ek on Apple, Facebook, Netflix and the future

This is probably the most balanced interview I’ve ever read from a software company executive. Daniel Ek’s perspective on technology and his company’s place in the world shows much more humility and a more nuanced understanding than we’ve come to expect from technology companies. It’s a refreshing read and offers a lot to learn, for anyone interested in understanding how to manage people, lead companies and leverage technology for effective social change.

Why Writing Matters in the Age of Despair

One of my goals for post-PhD life is to write more, on both technical and non-technical topics. So far I’ve been managing to keep a more or less regular habit of writing privately, but been publishing very infrequently, but am hoping to change that. As the author notes: the limits of our stories are the limits of our lives. Our words should open up the world, not close it off. Our words should include all, not trap them in cages. I see every story, every word as a struggle of memory against forgetting.

Nick Offerman’s New Definition of Manliness

I’ve been a big fan of Nick Offerman ever since watching Parks & Recreation. This article seems to sum up his view on life and manliness, which in turn is summed up by his line about whiskey: my advice is to craft your life in such a way that your whiskey drinking can be for enjoyment, which means that it’s delicious and in moderation, rather than for escapism, or to obliterate your consciousness.

Sunday Selection 2018-07-29

Around the Web

Lena Dunham Explores Alone Time After a Breakup

I recently moved to a new city to start a new job and am in the slow and not-quite-steady process of rebuilding my social circle. Though it’s not the quite the same flavor of loneliness as after a relationship, being comfortable of doing things entirely on one’s own again takes time and effort. On the one hand, I know that this too will pass, but on the other hand, knowing that doesn’t necessarily make the awkward or uncomfortable moments any less awkward or uncomfortable.

The Most Important Skill Nobody Taught You

One side affect of finding oneself alone again after being used to a vibrant social life is getting used to a larger-than-usual amount of quiet time by oneself. As a child, and during most of my teens, I was content, and quite happy with a lot of time to myself. Over the years, I seem to have lost that ability, at times feeling like a part of myself is missing. The modern Attention Economy makes it all the harder for sitting quietly with oneself to be a normal part of daily life, and that in turn makes periods of solitude all the more uncomfortable. I’m hoping that this is another skill that can be (re-)learned given enough time and practice (both of which I have ample of for now).

Conjuring Creative Permission from our Tools

For a long time now I’ve considered myself a materialist — I like nice things, especially when it comes to things that I use day in and day out. But I also like having a small number of such things and taking good care of them (the difference being a materialist and a consumer is something I’ll explore another day). Craig Mod is also one of my favorite writers when it comes to the question of tools and how they can shape and direct your creative work. Pair this with his excellent GF1 Field Test and Leica Q Field Test.

Video

Star Wars : The Clone Wars

A conversation about Star Wars during a long drive made me start rewatching this wonderful animated TV show set in the Star Wars universe during the Clone Wars (as the name suggests). It has a broader range of characters and more in-depth story arcs than the movies and is a testament to how good storytelling can be with a good premise and enough time to do a good job (which probably goes part of the way to explaining the recent increase in really good television shows).

Sunday Selection 2018-06-17

It’s summer, it’s bright, sunny and getting unreasonably hot, the students are off on vacation or internships, and Kate Spade and Anthony Bourdain passed away recently. After a few weeks of traveling, I’ve been spending the last few days reading about Anthony Bourdain, Buddhism and meditation (not necessarily in that order). Along those lines:

Around the Web

The Omnivore’s Agenda

An interview with Bourdain from several years ago. It’s a good summary and glimpse into his life, work and views on cooking, food and living. If you don’t know much about Bourdain, or haven’t seen his shows, this is a good place to start.

Let’s Talk About Someone Who Could Appreciate a Waffle House

Fun fact: I occasionally get a junk food craving, and on road trips I give myself a pass to eat whatever probably-unhealthy-probably-carcinogenic food I might stumble upon. On one of these recent road trips I learned that my mother apparently likes unglazed donuts from Dunkin Donuts. Go figure. Anyways, Bourdain appreciating a Waffle House should come as no surprise, but also makes me realize that appreciating both foie gras and Waffle House maybe takes a certain kind of person, or at least a certain spirit and openness, that hopefully can be cultivated.

Why Should I Meditate?

Why indeed. Maybe it will make you 10% Happier. Personally I’m coming around to the idea that meditation is essential for mental health in the same way that cardio and weightlifting is essential for physical health.

The Onion Declares War on Mark Zuckerberg and Facebook

It was bound to happen eventually, but still…

From the Bookshelf

Why Buddhism is True

I’m only about half way through this, but it’s one of the better examples of explaining why Buddhist practices, specifically meditation, “work”. To my pleasant surprise, it also does a good job of explaining certain tricky Buddhist concepts in clear terms (better than a lot of articles I’ve read written about Buddhism by Buddhists). It’s a long read, but definitely worth it.

Sunday Selection 2018-05-06

I promise that one day there will actually be another proper post on this site. Until that time, here’s another issue of interesting things from around the Web.

Around the Web

Reconsidering the Hardware Kindle Interface

The Kindle is probably my favorite single-purpose electronic device. I’m currently using the Voyage and generally love the acceptable high resolution and contrast, the fast page automatic backlight adjustment, and the flat, clean design. That being said, I agree with Craig Mod’s opinion in this article: moving a few key interface elements to dedicated physical buttons would make the whole experience much smoother.

Why Local Newspaper Websites are So Terrible

It’s no big secret that newspaper are having a rough time in this age of ad-driven everything, and free content. This article summarizes the contending issues and priorities that drive newspaper websites to be, by and large, terrible. While I continue to hold out hope for an online newspaper that is as clean and easy to read as Longreads or Instapaper, there are deep economic problems that need to be solved first and I have no idea how to go about tackling them.

From the Bookshelf

Neil Gaiman’s Norse Mythology

I remember having a book of Norse mythology as a child and reading it many times over. Neil Gaiman’s version reminds of those readings often, but with Neil Gaiman’s signature style that brings out the quirky, whimsical, and often just plain weird details of Norse mythology. If you’re a Neil Gaiman fan, or interested in old-fashioned mythologies, or just like fun, slightly silly stories, this is worth picking up.

Video

Avengers: Infinity War

Enjoyable and worth watching once. Fitting together so many characters with their intertwining stories and motivations is no mean feat and this version manages to do so quite well. I liked some of the details and the storylines of some characters, but overall there was a lot happening in not a lot of time, leading to things feeling rushed at times.