One of the lifestyle changes I’ve been wanting to make in 2019 is to reduce my consumption and to live in a way that is more considered and careful. I’ve already written about how I’m doing that when it comes to information and media consumption. In more material ways I’m trying to do things like take more public transport, eat out less, and reduce the amount of food and non-recyclable waste that I produce. I’m also trying to reduce the computational resources I use, and by extension the energy, human and natural resources used.

I’ve been a happy Linode user for several years now. I started using what was then their lowest tier at $20 a month to host some of my websites and small web applications. Over the years, I’ve been paying the same amount per month but been getting upgraded to more powerful virtual servers, until I got up to their Linode 4GB Standard tier: 4GB of RAM, 2 CPU cores, 80 GB of SSD storage and 4TB of network transfer. If that sounds like overkill for serving a few small websites, you’re probably right.

Linode is starting to migrate users from a monthly billing plan to an hourly billing plan. In the process of reading about the plan differences (spoiler: not much for small users like myself), I decided to re-evaluate how much computation I actually needed and used. The above mentioned specs were far more than what I needed, or could see myself needing in the near future. So I downgraded to the current lowest Linode configuration, the Nanode: just 1GB of RAM, 1 CPU core, 25 GB of SSD storage and 1TB of network transfer. That should be more than enough for my needs, and will cost me just $5 a month.

I could probably go even lower and do most of my hosting out of GitHub Pages, or an Amazon S3 bucket, but I find it useful to have an actual virtual server to run arbitrary programs on if I need to. I am planning on making some more changes to my computing usage in the near future. Currently the VPS runs Arch Linux with a fairly large list of userspace tools (including a full OCaml compilation stack). The lower specs will probably make compiling things on this VPS annoyingly slow, so in the future I’ll be compiling on my local Linux machine and just moving binaries over. I will also be switching over to using Alpine Linux to run an even lighter system. Also, this blog currently runs on WordPress.com. That has worked out pretty well, but for a number of reasons I think it’s time to part ways. I’ll go into those reasons in depth in a future post, and I will be moving the blog over to said Linode VPS over the next few weeks.

Now, I’m fully aware that this doesn’t make a huge impact on anything in the grand scheme of things. And yes, part of doing this a reason to just geek out on UNIX sysadmin-y things that I don’t do much these days. But still, I do believe that if a few minor changes can make a positive effect on the world (no matter how small), then it is worth investing the time and energy to make those changes.

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Sunday Selection 2019-03-24

I’m trying to write more and regularly, and have been doing well this past week. I also have plans for the continued development of this blog (more on that tomorrow). Time will tell how long I manage to keep this up. For now, I’m doing away with the categories I had for my Sunday Selection posts and just presenting a bunch of interesting things.

Authentic Happiness by Martin Seligman

I spent a more than usual amount of time on public transport last week and I decided to use that time to read a book rather than just people-watching, or reading random things on my phone. I’m about half way through this one, and it’s already changed some of my perspectives on life and how I deal with challenges and changes (and there have been a lot of those recently).

The only metric of success that really matters is the one we ignore

I mildly hate the absolute tone of this clickbait-y headline (as we all know, only a Sith deals in absolutes), and it’s not the best written piece on the matter, but it highlights important points we often forget. I’ve been lucky to have lots of friends and a healthy amount of socialization for most of my life, but I don’t think I’ve done a very good job at building or being part of a community. Building and becoming a part of a strong, stable, and welcoming community is something I want to focus on in my thirties, though I’m still figuring out how.

Why is reading in the pub so enjoyable?

I’m a big fan of reading, and of reading in public places. I usually prefer classy bars or cozy cafes rather than pubs, but the general idea of reading in a pub definitely appeals to me. On the other hand, these days I find myself preferring quiet places for reading and working, so I’ve been doing more of my reading at home (though as noted above I did a lot of reading on public transport last week).

My Alpine Linux Desktop

And now for something completely different. I’ve been reconsidering my computing needs and environment over the last few days (more on that too tomorrow). I’m considering moving over to Alpine Linux, especially for anything that is public-facing, like my websites. Alpine is a very low overhead, minimal distribution that includes a bunch of security-enhancing patches and development techniques.

Captain Marvel

I went to see Captain Marvel last weekend and really enjoyed it. I wouldn’t say it’s great, but it’s definitely good. It’s very well made with the now-standard Marvel approach of blending a timely political theme with fun characters and beautiful visuals. Brie Larsen does a great job and the CGI de-aging on Samuel L. Jackson is really well done. I would watch it again.

Over the last few months (years?) I’ve been noticing the increasingly deleterious effect of excessive information consumption of my state-of-mind in general and my ability to concentrate for long periods of time in particular.

With that in mind (get it? I’m sorry) I’m trying to be more careful about my information consumption.  Part of that is trying to consume higher quality things in smaller quantities, and spending more time and effort enjoying and appreciating what I’m experiencing. But part of it is also revisiting things that I really enjoyed once.

Over the last few years I’ve been largely listening to music via Spotify. While it’s been great for discovering new artists and music without spending tons of money, it’s also led to some bad habits. I often get lazy and listen the same playlist of Spotify-curated tracks on repeat. I also neglect my fairly large personal collection of music that’s sitting around on my computer.

So I’m going to try to listen to more music from my personal, local collection, including a bunch of the aforementioned things I used to really enjoy.  Since I’m near my MacBook most of time, I’ll be listening to MP3s via iTunes. Some of my collection is messy, so I’ll be using the excellent Beets tool to clean up and organize my collection as I go. Today I’m listening to Blind Guardian, starting with The Forgotten Tales album. I’ll also be keeping a Twitter thread of things I’m listening to as I go along (if I can remember to update it).

Sunday Selection 2018-05-06

I promise that one day there will actually be another proper post on this site. Until that time, here’s another issue of interesting things from around the Web.

Around the Web

Reconsidering the Hardware Kindle Interface

The Kindle is probably my favorite single-purpose electronic device. I’m currently using the Voyage and generally love the acceptable high resolution and contrast, the fast page automatic backlight adjustment, and the flat, clean design. That being said, I agree with Craig Mod’s opinion in this article: moving a few key interface elements to dedicated physical buttons would make the whole experience much smoother.

Why Local Newspaper Websites are So Terrible

It’s no big secret that newspaper are having a rough time in this age of ad-driven everything, and free content. This article summarizes the contending issues and priorities that drive newspaper websites to be, by and large, terrible. While I continue to hold out hope for an online newspaper that is as clean and easy to read as Longreads or Instapaper, there are deep economic problems that need to be solved first and I have no idea how to go about tackling them.

From the Bookshelf

Neil Gaiman’s Norse Mythology

I remember having a book of Norse mythology as a child and reading it many times over. Neil Gaiman’s version reminds of those readings often, but with Neil Gaiman’s signature style that brings out the quirky, whimsical, and often just plain weird details of Norse mythology. If you’re a Neil Gaiman fan, or interested in old-fashioned mythologies, or just like fun, slightly silly stories, this is worth picking up.

Video

Avengers: Infinity War

Enjoyable and worth watching once. Fitting together so many characters with their intertwining stories and motivations is no mean feat and this version manages to do so quite well. I liked some of the details and the storylines of some characters, but overall there was a lot happening in not a lot of time, leading to things feeling rushed at times.

Sunday Selection 2018-04-29

Albert Camus, by Cecil Beaton.
Albert Camus, by Cecil Beaton.

Neither Victims Nor Executioners: Albert Camus on the Antidote to Violence

Another excellent Brain Pickings piece, this time on Albert Camus who offers a pragmatic balance between idealism and reality. Popova summarizes this piece (as she does so well) with the excerpt: If he who bases his hopes on human nature is a fool, he who gives up in the face of circumstance is a coward.”

So Two Stoics Walk Into a Bar

I’ve previously noted my interest in Stoicism and Buddhism which share various philosophical similarities. This is a modern take on classic Stoic dialogue where we see two speakers (ostensible Epictetus and Seneca) discuss the intricacies of wanting, desire and acceptance. Without giving much away, I can say that it ends on the interesting note: The more understanding and acceptance you have of the reality of living, the less you are impacted when circumstances knock you down.

 Japan’s Rent-a-Family Industry

An intriguing, slightly unbelievable and at times heart-breaking look at the Japanese industry of “renting” family members for both major occasions and day-to-day life. Told from multiple perspectives, peppered with historical details and finalized by the author’s own unique observations and reactions, this is may be the best piece of non-political non-fiction I’ve read so far this year.

On Using Field Notebooks

I’ve started using a physical field notebook more often in the last few months. As a computer scientist, I don’t exactly go out into the field, but I have found the process of getting away from the computer and writing things out on paper (especially if I can do it outdoors in the sun), to be a good way to get my mind into a state of deep work. This a good piece on the practice on science in different areas, and different times.