WordPress bugginess on Android

This year I’ve been trying to reduce my use of social media, and of my phone. These two goals go hand-in-hand: if I don’t have social media apps on my phone I am less tempted to keep looking at it, checking for something new. It also means that when I get a notification on my phone, it is more likely to be a message (via SMS, or messaging apps) meant specifically for me, rather than some low-information notification to increase my “engagement” with a social media app. Together, this is a way for me to keep believing in the Internet, and ensuring that I’m using it, rather than the other way around.

Another aspect of reducing dependence on social media is investing more in my own, independent publishing platforms: this blog, and my website. For the time being at least, this blog runs on WordPress.com which has apps for all the common platforms.

Part of achieving the above is posting not just longer articles and links to this blog, but also pictures capturing memorable moments in my day-to-day life. This is something I’ve been using Instagram for, but since I took the Instagram app off my phone, I wanted to see if I could use the WordPress Android app to do the same.

The answer is: sort of. I initially posted yesterday’s Sunday Selection post without the image. I then wandered out to one of my favorite local cafes where I took the picture. But adding the picture to the post using the WordPress Android app turned out to be more troublesome than I was expecting.

First I added the picture to the post from my phone’s photo gallery, and updated it. Everything seemed to work, but when I checked the post, the image URL appeared broken. For some reason the app used a URL for local Android storage rather than the uploaded image URL. If I somehow interrupted the image upload or the post update, this wasn’t clear at all.

Second I tried to edit the post again to make sure the changes had saved properly. But when I exited the post editing screen without actually making any edits, the app designed to remove all paragraph breaks from the post. Luckily WordPress seems to keep a version history for posts, so I could go back to an older version.

Finally, I ended up deleting the image from the post, and then adding it from the WordPress media library (which had the proper uploaded version of the image) and re-publishing. This seemed to finally work.

So I managed to do what I wanted, but the fact that what should be a common use case was so buggy leaves a really bad impression. While I don’t want to go back to using other platforms for this, I’m now much less excited to use WordPress for this. For now, I’m willing to give WordPress the benefit of the doubt. Maybe this is a one-off use case, or these bugs will be fixed in future versions, but I certainly am disappointed.

I’m excited about technology again

For the first time in a long time (several years), I’m actually excited by the state of consumer technology. This includes both things that are currently available, as well as products that will (hopefully) come out in the near future. And what’s even better, there are actually a lot of such things I’m excited about.

First off: USB-C all the things. My phone is charged by USB-C, so are my headphones, and my tablet. The only holdovers are my Kindle Voyage, which needs to be charged very infrequently, and my laptop (which we will get to in a bit). Be aware though, not all USB-C cables are made the same. Beyond the obvious physical utility of just needing just one kind of connector, USB-C enables other little conveniences. Being able to carry around a single charger (or battery) that can charge all my devices, at high speed (due to high wattage), makes being on the go much more convenient. Furthermore, the Thunderbolt 3 data connection standard uses the same physical format as USB-C. That means it’s actually possible to plug a single cable into a laptop (or tablet) and have it charge and connect to peripherals like external monitors, speakers, input devices, external GPUs and storage at the same time, and at very high speeds (possibly with a Thunderbolt 3 dock in the middle).

Perhaps the only thing better than having one kind of connector, is having no connector at all. I’m not an audiophile, so most of the time I perfectly happy with Bluetooth noise-cancelling headphones, especially on long flights (that I am doing more of these days). And while Bluetooth keyboards and mice have been around for a while, we now have decent, semi-portable mechanical Bluetooth keyboards. I’m looking forward to having both wireless data and power in the not-too-distant future, but till then, I can deal with plugging in my things overnight (or every couple nights for most of them) and being untethered the rest of the time.

On the subject of keyboards, I got into mechanical keyboards a few years. The mechanical keyboard market seems to have expanded greatly in the last few years, with innovation in switches, layouts, keycaps, programmability and design. I can’t justify owning more than two (one for work and work from home), but I’m happy to see that there’s something for everybody.

Next: monitors. A 4K resolution at 27″ is absolutely beautiful. I run mine with resolution scaling, which means that every “digital” pixel is mapped to 4 physical pixels on the screen. And that means that text is super crisp. As someone who mostly deals with text, and loves fonts and typography, the experience is wonderful. A lot of 4K monitors can also double up as USB-C hubs, which means one less adapter or connection to worry about.

My current phone is the Pixel 3a, which I think is the best product Google has made in long time. It’s relatively cheap (especially on Black Friday), has decent specs, a clean, straight-from-Google version of Android, and a great camera. The battery currently lasts almost two full days for my moderate usage, which is good for my peace of mind. I don’t super-like the plastic (I’m sorry, polycarbonate) body, but it’s just fine for the price. I’m hoping the multiple cameras from the Pixel 4 come to a future Pixel 4a. It not, I see myself being happy with the 3a for a long time.

Finally, computers, by which I mean both tablets and laptops. Let’s start with the iPad. I have the 11″ iPad Pro from last year. It’s the closest that Apple has come to realizing the device’s potential (though it’s not quite there yet). The stylus is magnetically attached to the side and is charged that way as well. The iPad is USB-C, not Lightning (thankfully),the bezels are slim and uniform, the screen is beautiful and the battery lasts for days. The ARM-based processor in it is very powerful, but since I mostly use it to read and mark up, it’s not something that makes a big difference for me. The software however, still leaves much to be desired. I would love to use it for programming, but I can’t stand the thought of doing that straitjacketed into siloed apps.

On the subject of things Apple is doing right, I hear the new 16″ MacBook Pro is very good. I’m rather proud to say that I’m still using a 13″ MacBook Pro from 2015 (with a battery replacement), but I’m hoping that the improvements of the 16″ are brought to a 13″ or 14″ model in the near future. USB-C, Thunderbolt 3, a top-of-the-line processor, lots of fast memory, an ample SSD, a big trackpad, and a not-terrible keyboard. I will be sad to give up Magsafe, but it’s a price worth paying.

All that being said, the computing devices I find the most exciting are actually Microsoft’s Surface line. The Surface laptops look great, especially in black. The Surface Pro might be the best “ultra-portable” machine on the market, especially for business users. And finally, the Surface Pro X with its ARM processor and LTE chip could be a very interesting device for developers and users alike, assuming Microsoft can provide the developer support it really needs. The only downside is that none of them support Thunderbolt 3 at the moment. Maybe next year?

Most of what I’ve talked about, is on the market right now. As for the future, I am looking forward to more interesting ARM-based devices, and the software support to make proper use of them. A Surface Pro X that can be used to both develop and run ARM applications, and supports Thunderbolt 3, would be an almost perfect portable device. More realistically, a 13″ MacBook Pro is likely in the next few months, which means I can finally upgrade in peace.

And on a final aesthetic note, matte black all the things, except for the MacBook (and no, Space Gray doesn’t cut it).

I run a small fashion shop, Figura, where I design, sew and sell women’s clothes. It’s my way of balancing the concept design with a more hands-on kind of job. My favorite part is definitely the patterning. I do it on paper in a very old-school way. Patterning seems to be one of the most “stable” technologies ever – I can literally sew a dress by 19th century’s pattern and it will work just fine, while my partner complains about JavaScript framework changes weekly.

I was reading the Uses This interview of Elena Zaharova when I came across this paragraph. It reminded of a pet project I would like to do one day (but probably will never get around to): designing and building a networked computer system to run and be usable (which includes being programmable) for 100 years, with minimal maintenance.

One of the lifestyle changes I’ve been wanting to make in 2019 is to reduce my consumption and to live in a way that is more considered and careful. I’ve already written about how I’m doing that when it comes to information and media consumption. In more material ways I’m trying to do things like take more public transport, eat out less, and reduce the amount of food and non-recyclable waste that I produce. I’m also trying to reduce the computational resources I use, and by extension the energy, human and natural resources used.

I’ve been a happy Linode user for several years now. I started using what was then their lowest tier at $20 a month to host some of my websites and small web applications. Over the years, I’ve been paying the same amount per month but been getting upgraded to more powerful virtual servers, until I got up to their Linode 4GB Standard tier: 4GB of RAM, 2 CPU cores, 80 GB of SSD storage and 4TB of network transfer. If that sounds like overkill for serving a few small websites, you’re probably right.

Linode is starting to migrate users from a monthly billing plan to an hourly billing plan. In the process of reading about the plan differences (spoiler: not much for small users like myself), I decided to re-evaluate how much computation I actually needed and used. The above mentioned specs were far more than what I needed, or could see myself needing in the near future. So I downgraded to the current lowest Linode configuration, the Nanode: just 1GB of RAM, 1 CPU core, 25 GB of SSD storage and 1TB of network transfer. That should be more than enough for my needs, and will cost me just $5 a month.

I could probably go even lower and do most of my hosting out of GitHub Pages, or an Amazon S3 bucket, but I find it useful to have an actual virtual server to run arbitrary programs on if I need to. I am planning on making some more changes to my computing usage in the near future. Currently the VPS runs Arch Linux with a fairly large list of userspace tools (including a full OCaml compilation stack). The lower specs will probably make compiling things on this VPS annoyingly slow, so in the future I’ll be compiling on my local Linux machine and just moving binaries over. I will also be switching over to using Alpine Linux to run an even lighter system. Also, this blog currently runs on WordPress.com. That has worked out pretty well, but for a number of reasons I think it’s time to part ways. I’ll go into those reasons in depth in a future post, and I will be moving the blog over to said Linode VPS over the next few weeks.

Now, I’m fully aware that this doesn’t make a huge impact on anything in the grand scheme of things. And yes, part of doing this a reason to just geek out on UNIX sysadmin-y things that I don’t do much these days. But still, I do believe that if a few minor changes can make a positive effect on the world (no matter how small), then it is worth investing the time and energy to make those changes.

Sunday Selection 2019-03-24

I’m trying to write more and regularly, and have been doing well this past week. I also have plans for the continued development of this blog (more on that tomorrow). Time will tell how long I manage to keep this up. For now, I’m doing away with the categories I had for my Sunday Selection posts and just presenting a bunch of interesting things.

Authentic Happiness by Martin Seligman

I spent a more than usual amount of time on public transport last week and I decided to use that time to read a book rather than just people-watching, or reading random things on my phone. I’m about half way through this one, and it’s already changed some of my perspectives on life and how I deal with challenges and changes (and there have been a lot of those recently).

The only metric of success that really matters is the one we ignore

I mildly hate the absolute tone of this clickbait-y headline (as we all know, only a Sith deals in absolutes), and it’s not the best written piece on the matter, but it highlights important points we often forget. I’ve been lucky to have lots of friends and a healthy amount of socialization for most of my life, but I don’t think I’ve done a very good job at building or being part of a community. Building and becoming a part of a strong, stable, and welcoming community is something I want to focus on in my thirties, though I’m still figuring out how.

Why is reading in the pub so enjoyable?

I’m a big fan of reading, and of reading in public places. I usually prefer classy bars or cozy cafes rather than pubs, but the general idea of reading in a pub definitely appeals to me. On the other hand, these days I find myself preferring quiet places for reading and working, so I’ve been doing more of my reading at home (though as noted above I did a lot of reading on public transport last week).

My Alpine Linux Desktop

And now for something completely different. I’ve been reconsidering my computing needs and environment over the last few days (more on that too tomorrow). I’m considering moving over to Alpine Linux, especially for anything that is public-facing, like my websites. Alpine is a very low overhead, minimal distribution that includes a bunch of security-enhancing patches and development techniques.

Captain Marvel

I went to see Captain Marvel last weekend and really enjoyed it. I wouldn’t say it’s great, but it’s definitely good. It’s very well made with the now-standard Marvel approach of blending a timely political theme with fun characters and beautiful visuals. Brie Larsen does a great job and the CGI de-aging on Samuel L. Jackson is really well done. I would watch it again.