Puppy Linux 2.0 released

    Seems to be distro party this month. Not only has my favourite Linux Distro ubuntu come out with it's newest release, my current operating system and favourite LiveCD, Puppy has also released a new version. Although this doesn't feature many visible changes like Ubuntu does, there's been a lot of work done under the hood and some parts have been rewritten from scratch. So go ahead and give it go, don't worry about bandwidth, it's just 70MB. I haven't given it a try yet, but I will soon.

Ubuntu 6.06 Dapper Drake released

Ladies and Gentlemen, it's the 1st of June 2006 and right on schedule, Ubuntu 6.06 has been released! This is certainly the most anticipated Linux Distribution release this year, and with good reason. This release makes a significant improvement over earlier versions and also sports a new, beautiful graphical look and feel. One of the biggest complaints about earlier versions was that the default Ubuntu look was, well, a bit ugly. Look's like the developers have paid heed, and while the desktop is still GNOME, the colour scheme is now orange, not brown, and has a new graphics engine, which is full of animations and shine and polish. This release is also important as it comes with an extended support period. Uptil now, each release would receive patches and security updates for 18 months. Dapper Drake will get them for at least five years. This is part of the push to give Ubuntu a greater presence in enterprise. Now, enough said. Go look at some screenshots and when you're done with that, go and download the CD, or if you're willing to wait a month, order free CDs.

Web Storage review: the World Wide Hard Drive

Running a computer without a hard disk isn't easy, especially when it comes to file storage options. But a proliferation of new Web 2.0 options has made it a lot easier to keep your files stored and organized online without needing specialized software or a technical knowhow. Web storage options fall into basically two categories: storage centric and sharing centric. it's obvious that if you're looking for a hard drive replacement, storage centric is the way. There are a whole host of services for you to try out, here's a short list: AllMyData, Box.net, eSnips, Freepository, GoDaddy, iStorage, Mofile, Mozy, Omnidrive, Openomy, Streamload, Strongspace and Xdrive.

Now, not all of these are suitable for the purpose of a hard drive free system. For example, Xdrive's free version gives you 5GB of space, but lasts only for a month. For me, paying for storage is not something I'm ready to do at the moment. Then there is AllMyData, which brings ideas from file-sharing to web storage: you get webspace only if you give a part of your own hard drive for others to store their files on. Not only can i not use this service, but I don't think storing your data on computers that aren't dedicated to file storage is a good idea. Streamload on the other, takes the word "storage" very literally. Everyone gets a whopping 5GB of space for free, but there's a catch, your bandwidth is limited. In the free version you can only download 100MB a month. So it's good if you want to stash away your whole hard drive, but doesn't quite cut it for a hard-drive-less machine. I'm currently using a service called Openomy, which gives a free 1GB of storage and uses a simple tag system to organize your files.

The leader of the pack, in my opinion and for my needs is Omnidrive. It gives you 2GB of space, with no bandwidth or file size restrictions and has an open API, allowing you to integrate it into your applications. But what takes the cake is a technology which allows you to open, edit and save back a file to their system, without actually downloading it onto your hard drive. This is a great feature to have if you've lost your hard disk. I haven't tried it out yet, because it's still in private beta, but one of their support staff got back to me after i asked for an invitation and told me that i'll get an invite in a few days. I'll check it out then and i sure hope it lives up to expectation.

There is one more storage option that deserves mention: Gmail. For many people Gmail's huge 2.5GB inbox is far too much for just simple email. There are a number of tools out there that allow you to use your Gmail account to store files. However I wouldn't recommend this unless you're desperate or just can't help experimenting. It's not that I doubt the quality of the tools, but rather that Google has been known to make random changes to it's code internally and one of those changes might break the tools you're using, And why go to all that trouble when there are far simpler and more reliable options out there? But if you are interested in Google's file system, then go take a look at this article. Hope this has been informative, and if know about anything that can aid my quest for hard-drive free computing, do leave a comment.

Let your puppy show you how to run your computer without a Hard Disk

Ye, it is possible, and I'm going to tell you why and how. So hold on. First here's why you don't need a hard disk: All you really need to run a computer is an operating system, which can access and use the computer's processor and dynamic memory (RAM). It really doesn't matter where this operating comes from. The Hard drive is just a place to store the operating system, software and other information when it's not being used. In theory you can use any storage media to store all this. Guess what, you can do it in practice too. It's just a simple case of writing software designed to run off your desired storage medium and not the hard disk. No, you don't have to do it yourself. People have done it already.

My latest discovery is a beautiful piece of technical wizardry that goes by the unassuming name of Puppy Linux. it's a Live CD with a difference. Live CD's allow you to run an operating system straight off the CD. Unfortunately most Live CD's take the place of the Hard Drive a bit too closely, i.e. the software remains on the CD and is loaded into the RAM as and when needed. Puppy Linux turns this on it's head. When the CD boots, the whole OS is loaded into RAM. This is possible because the Operating System along with a variety of graphic tools, office software, multimedia programs and a full internet suite has been squeezed into a mere 60MB. So if you have a computer with just 64MB of RAM, you can run Puppy with ease. And the fun just starts there. Once the computer has booted up, you can actually take out the Puppy CD and put in another CD, without so much as missed byte. The Operating System simply doesn't care because it's all free of storage media. So you can listen to a music CD or even watch a DVD. And when you're done working, just pop in the Puppy Linux CD, and before shutdown any new files that you have created and any modfications you have made (including new programs installed) will be written to the free space on the disk. Now you not only have your documents on a portable CD, but your whole Operating System. (Yes, if you have a Hard Drive you can save files to it). And If all this CD swapping isn't your thing, your Puppy can even hitch a ride on a USB stick.

So what you are waiting for? Trash that hard disk and go adopt a Puppy today! 

Preparing for a Massive Multiboot

Multibooting a host of different Operating Systems is a challenge, but first I need to get a machine to multiboot on. Here are the system specs in case you're interested:

  • Intel Pentium 4 2.8 GHz
  • 512 MB RAM
  • Samsung CD-RW/DVD combo drive
  • 80 GB Hard disk
  • 17 inch CRT monitor, mouse, keyboard, usual assorted cables

Everything is already at home, except for the monitor which is currently at my Uncle's house and which my dad's going to get in the afternoon. So in the evening I should be in a position to start to set up my Massively Multibooting Machine. But that also means that i need to decide exactly how many partitions I want. The simplest would be either eight 10GB partitions or ten 8GB partitions and that would be great if all the partitions had more or less the same function. But they don't. 

Referring to the Operating system list in the last post, Ubuntu will be my primary OS, which I will use for the more mundane tasks of emailing, blogging, writing documents etc.  Arch will be my Linux experimentation OS, where I can learn about the internals of a Linux system. So that's two partitions, which should have 10 GB each. Third is a partition for PCLinuxOS, which I want because I think that it is the best KDE-based distro currently out there, and I really don't want to install KDE in Ubuntu. That shouldn't need more than 5GB. 

Before I start making partitions for my experimental OS's I think I should set apart disk space for my media and documents. My music alone weighs in at around 5GB and is expected to grow. Then there is about a gigabyte of miscellaneous files which are currently in my Home folder. And I should have a good 2 GB spare for keeping ISO images of distros. That brings it to around 8 GB in all. It would be prudent to keep some margin so about 14GB should be more than enough to meet any eventualities. Add to that a gigabyte of swap space.

That brings the total to 25GB for permanent operating systems and 15GB for data and swap, making it 40GB in all. That still leaves about half my drive free. I am tempted to partition it all right now, but it would be a better idea to wait. Most Operating Systems won't need more than 2GB of space and my list of OS's that I want to try is bound to keep changing. So the 40Gb will be hanging around as free space for now.

Getting the host of Linux systems to coexist shouldn't be too much of a hassle, but i am concerned with other systems like the BSD's, Minix3 and other more exotic operating systems that I'm interested in trying. I'm currently looking through the 100-OS forum posts and the GRUB manual. I'll be too busy tomorrow to try anything interesting, so most of the multi-boot action will have to wait till Monday.