Sunday Selection 2018-01-28

Around the Web

Field Notes Shenandoah Edition

Field Notes Shenandoah Edition

Why Field Notes Have Remained Curiously Addictive for a Decade

In the last few years, I’ve become a big fan of pen (and pencil) and paper for taking notes, journaling and sketching out ideas. More recently, I started carrying around a Field Notes pocket notebook all the time and using it to write down and keep track of all kinds of things about my day-to-day life. This is a wide-ranging and very interesting article about how Field Notes got started and kept going, along with a healthy dose of context to understand the why paper notebooks seem to making a comeback.

From inboxing to thought showers: how business bullshit took over

I’m very grateful to work in a field and environment where I have to deal with very little “business bullshit” on a regular basis. But this is an interesting look at how differences in language can shape the way we think and act and can spread unchecked through society at large. Pair this with an older article on the phenomenon of bullshit jobs.

Human Values and Science, Art and Mathematics

I am a big fan of Maria Popova’s Brain Pickings blog and this is, in my opinion, the best article she’s written so far this year. It contain’s excerpts from an out-of-print by Lilian Lieber of the above name interspersed with Popova’s commentary. The book starts off using the discovery of non-Euclidean geometry to explain how science progresses, and then extends that line of reasoning to understanding the human condition, ending with a set of postulates that I think deserves to sit right beside Utilitarianism and Kant’s Categorical Imperative as foundational moral principles. A long, interesting and inspiring read. I hope to get my hands on a copy of the book itself someday.

From the Bookshelf

The Rise and Fall of DODO by Neal Stephenson and Nicole Galland

I started this year wanting to read one book a week, but it looks like I might end up at one book a month instead. Oh well, I think I picked a good one to start with. Without going into details, this book blends together magic, time travel, politics, and a wide range of curious characters into a gripping and hard-to-put-down read. This book has made me stay up past my bedtime reading for the first time in a long while.

Video

Pacific Rim: Uprising 2nd trailer

The original Pacific Rim is one of my favorite movies. As far as movies go, I would it’s very good, but not excellent, but it is a whole lot of fun with a lot of great and unconventional characters. I’m really looking forward to the second installment, and to seeing more of Guillermo del Toro’s excellent work.

Books I read in 2017

A quick post about books I’ve read in 2017 to ring in the New Year. There weren’t many (something to change in 2018), but I’m very happy with the ones I did read.

Why Not Me? by Mindy Kaling

This was the first book I read in 2017. I don’t remember much about it, other than being impressed by how hard working Mindy Kaling was. Goodreads tells me I gave it 5 stars, so I must have really liked it at the time.

Man’s Search for Meaning by Victor Frankl

I read this in one sitting during a cross-country flight. Reading about what victims of the Holocaust endured in Nazi concentration camps has a way of putting your life’s problems in perspective. The first part of the book focuses on how the average person survives and reacts to life in the brutality and extreme cruelty of a concentration camp. The second part of the book introduces Frankl’s theories of meaning as expressed in his approach to psychology: logotherapy. In essence, the meaning of life is found in every moment of living, even in the midst of suffering and death. 5 stars and highly recommended for everyone.

American Gods by Neil Gaiman

Very enjoyable and signature Neil Gaiman. I loved the themes, the concepts, the writing style and especially how Gaiman weaves together so many different characters and ideas into a single coherent narrative. I was a little disappointed by what felt like a anti-climactic resolution, but the rest of the book is good enough to warrant 4 stars.

Frankenstein by Mary Shelley

I was really looking forward to reading this and comparing it to all the modern portrayals of Frankenstein (both the doctor and his monster). But full confession: Dr. Frankenstein comes off as a complete jerk and I got tired of his whining about two thirds through the book and couldn’t finish. The monster’s parts, by comparison, were captivating and very enjoyable. Maybe I’ll manage to get through it this year.

Deep Work: Rules for Focused Success in a Distracted World by Cal Newport

The only self-help book I read this year and it was definitely a good choice. It’s a dense book and I haven’t implemented all the suggestions, but it has certainly helped me think more about how I go about my work and made me reconsider and pay more attention to things like how many distractions I tolerate. Consider this required reading for anyone working in an intellectual or creative field. My only complaint is that some of the chapters are really long with lots of information, some restructuring into smaller segments would have helped.

Binti and Binti:Home by Nnedi Okorafor

Great example of Afrofuturism and modern science fiction. I wouldn’t call it “hard” science fiction, but they are chock full of interesting concepts and ideas, and the characters and their perspectives are refreshingly different from standard science fiction tropes. I’m looking forward to the final book in the series that’s due out soon.