The Spirit of Jane Austen

After reading one too many posts about how to (and why we should) read more, last night I sat down to read an article on The Atlantic about Jane Austen. Though I remember reading Pride and Prejudice once upon a time, and am generally aware of her status as a cultural icon, I can’t say I know very much about Jane Austen. This piece was interesting as an insight into her cultural impact and changing interpretation over time. However, what stood out to me was the author’s interpretation of Austen and her characters as agents of the humanist revolution sweeping Europe and the West in the late eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. In particular, I was struck by this excerpt:

Spiritedness is a way of understanding oneself as having rights. It experiences those rights as a joy, as a sense of blossoming, of freedom; but also as something often in need of quickly roused defense. It is the style of the revolutions—American, French—encroaching on Austen’s Britain, put in the mouths of intelligent young women who know their own worth.

Elizabeth’s is a declaration of rights; she demands the pursuit of happiness.

Since we seem once more to be living in times where personal liberties and rights are being questioned, and to some extent redefined, perhaps it’s time to pick up some Austen.

Yesterday I rewrote about half (the entire front-end) of a project that took me and two other collaborators several months to complete a few years ago. At the end of a solid work afternoon, I had things compiling and running, but in a very buggy state. Unexpectedly, the associated feelings turned out to be somewhat bittersweet and conflicted. I’m happy and proud of how much I’ve improved in the years since I first worked on this project, but I’m also sad thinking of how much faster and better things might have gone originally if I had known back then all the things that I know now.

Later in the evening, I learned something new (GADTs and how to use them in OCaml), which makes me hope that in a few years I’ll be even more capable than I am now. At the same time, I’m also wary of falling into the trap of rehashing old projects and ideas with new tools and techniques, rather than moving forward into new areas.

A part of me really wants things to be “just right”, not just when it comes to work, but in the rest of my life as well. It’s almost a visceral when I have to deal with things that don’t seem (close to) perfect for long periods of time. But at the same time, keeping a steady pace of progress in research and engineering requires knowing when things are “right enough” and moving on to the next thing.

Navigating that boundary isn’t something that I have a lot of experience, but I’m hoping that just like my programming skills, it’s going to be something I get better at in the coming years.