Computer Science as a Creative Endeavor

Yesterday, Professor Eugene Wallingford posted about how computer science is not that different from a lot of other professions. Some parts of it are interesting and exciting, but a decent chunk is tedious, frustrating and boring as well. In his words:

Let’s be honest with ourselves and our students that getting good at anything takes a lot of hard work and, once you master something, you’ll occasionally face some tedium in the trenches. Science, and computer science in particular, are not that much different from anything else.

While I agree with the general message, in my experience, computer science is also a wonderfully creative and exciting endeavor (even if we often struggle to portray it as such).

Throughout college I had a variety of on-campus jobs. I was mostly trying to make some spending money, and pay for the occasional trip with friends. Through that time, I remember the jobs that were most fulfilling and interesting involved something that I would broadly call “computer science”. Some of it was doing honest-to-goodness computer science research (which later helped me get into graduate school), some of it was data crunching, and some of it was simply straightforward scripting and system administration, with a dash of web design. In fact, my first job involved calling up alumni asking for donations, and I promptly quit it after a week once I got a job doing some data processing for a professor.

Of course, I had found computers interesting for several years prior to my first college job, so I certainly wasn’t unbiased when I started comparing jobs. I can also imagine that a lot of people would consider calling up alumni a far more interesting job than munging CSV files with Python scripts. And there are certainly parts of even technically demanding programming tasks I find tiresome and would happily avoid (pretty much anything to do with CSS).

All that being said, (and with several years hindsight and interaction with professionals in other fields) I would place computer science on the same level of creativity as screenwriting and practicing law. In all these cases, there are certain structures and rules you have to follow, some more flexible than others. Some parts of tools and materials you have to work with are beautiful and elegant, others are messy and ugly but can be avoided in part, and some are just necessary evils. But within those rules and using those tools, you have the chance for exercising creativity and ingenuity, and maybe even some true beauty (if you’re lucky and capable enough). In fact, having taken a bunch of law classes, I would say that the practice of computer science has a lot in common with the practice of law (though that’s a matter for another post).

Perhaps the view of computer science as tedious is an indictment of our teaching methods, our tools, or the creeping incidental complexity that easily infests software projects of any size. But if projects like Pyret, Scratch and Jupyter notebooks are any indication, there seems to be concerted effort to change that. I’m not a fan of the mindset that says that HTML/CSS/JS must be taught to everyone, and it would be disingenuous to say that computer science is simple or easy. But as both academics and practitioners, I do hope that we can be honest about the effort and occasional drudgery involved, while helping understand and appreciate the joy of programming and the thrill of computation.

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Shrutarshi Basu

Programmer, writer and engineer, currently working out of Cornell University in Ithaca, New York.

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