On Reading More Books

One of my intentions for 2016 (I hesitate to call it a resolution) is to read more books. Over the last few years, the number of books I’ve read (and the frequency with which I read them) has steadily decreased. I haven’t kept records, but I couldn’t have read more than a handful in 2015. All this is despite the fact that I do in fact read a lot on a daily basis mostly in the form of blog posts and articles online.

My reasons for wanting to read more books, as opposed to just reading more in general, are mostly subjective. Firstly, my ability to sit with a piece over the course of several hours, follow the author’s text, remember what was said and gradually incorporate new material, has deteriorated over the years, and it’s an ability I sorely want back. Even the longest online essay rarely takes over half an hour to read. I want to feel comfortable following intricate arguments, or interesting plotlines again and I want to carve out several hours of time in a day to sit with a single activity (something that I’ve also been doing too little of in the recent past). Secondly, I want to get back to writing more regularly over the course of the year while getting better at writing, improving both quality and quantity, as it were. A prerequisite to writing well is to read well, and broadly. A side effect of that might be more book reviews and recommendations showing up here. Stay tuned.

Finally, I’m looking forward to embracing the physicality of books. Though I’ve shifted most of my reading to the Kindle Paperwhite over the last few years, I still own a good number of paper books and pick up a new one every now and then. In particular, for books that aren’t pure text, such as Molly Crabapple’s Drawing Blood, paper is still far superior to any electronic version. For me, even the Kindle Paperwhite is a more comfortable reading medium for books than a phone or computer screen. Personally, I’ve found that attaching myself to a screen has become the default activity for unscheduled time. Usually that screen is either a television for Netflix, or a phone for random Internet and social media things. It’s a default I’d very much like to change, and having a physical book or dedicated reader to turn to seems like a step in the right direction.

It’s going well so far. I’ve re-read Austin Kleon’s Steal Like an Artist and tore through Paul Kalanithi’s beautiful and devastating When Breath Becomes Air in just two days. Last night I cracked open Steven Pinker’s The Sense of Style which I hope will help with writing more and better. This morning I read the prologue to Molly Crabapple’s Drawing Blood while finishing my coffee and am really looking forward to the rest of it.

In addition to reading more, I would like to keep track of what I read. After all, Socrates will tell you that the unexamined life is not worth living. I’ve never been very good at this, but the tools to do so have never been easier. I’ve resurrected my long-default Goodreads account and brought it up to date on the readings of the year. Feel free to follow me, if you’re into that sort of thing (though I don’t plan on using it as more than a tracker). At the end of the year, I would like to have a record of what I read and some idea of what among them were the most memorable (though probably not a definitive “best of” list).

I’m hopeful that I’ll be able to end the year with a lot more read, a mind expanded, and perhaps some new interests discovered. I don’t want to set up any goals because I’d like this to be a low-stress endeavor, but I do hope to check in from time to time with news of progress, and of course pass along any jewels I discover. I am also very open to suggestions for interesting books from diverse domains.

Advertisements

Published by

Shrutarshi Basu

Programmer, writer and engineer, currently working out of Cornell University in Ithaca, New York.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s