A week with the Nexus 4

I bought my first smartphone about a year and a half ago. It was the straight-from-Google version of the Samsung Nexus S, meaning that it came without any carrier-installed crapware and no contract. However, it was already over a year old and a generation behind the times when I got it. That meant that it was already slower than the current state of art and came with the older Android 2.2 (which I upgraded a few months later to Ice Cream Sandwich). Overall it was a good phone, but has been gradually showing it’s age. It was having trouble using newer apps and the upgrade to Ice Cream Sandwich had been awkward enough that I didn’t even try to update it to Jelly Bean. I had been using T-mobile as my carrier and though I had one of their contract-free prepaid Monthly4G plans, I had carelessly bought the version of the phone with the wrong radio chipset, meaning I only got EDGE service most of the time.

The thought to upgrade to a new phone had been at the back of my mind for a few months. But the announcement of the Galaxy S4 as Google’s next flagship device made me take a look at the available options. While the S4 looks great, I wasn’t about to shell out $650 for a new phone. However, it turned out that the current flagship phone — the Nexus 4 — is available for $350 and it’s only a few months old. It was available unlocked and a quick search of the Intertubes suggested that it worked well on T-mobile’s network.

Google Nexus 4
The Google Nexus 4

The Nexus 4 is a good, solid device and is definitely a big step up from the Nexus S. The 1280 x 768,  4.7-inch display looks great, it’s slimmer and the 8MP camera is a much better than what the Nexus S. It also comes with Android 4.2 (Jelly Bean) and is fast enough to run heavy duty modern apps without skipping a beat. It doesn’t have LTE, but on T-Mobile’s HSPA+ network the speeds I do get are more than sufficient for my needs. The battery life is better than what I’m used to — I can generally end a busy day with about 15-20% to spare. Admittedly, I don’t stream a lot of video or upload lots of photos, so your mileage will probably vary.

On my Nexus S I rarely installed apps and never really explored the Android ecosystem (or rather, the Google Play store). But with a newer phone with an up-to-date version of Android, it was time to go exploring. I was pleasantly surprised to find that Android apps seem to be developing a UI style that is quite different from the iOS counterparts (though not quite as different as Windows Phone). Apps from both large companies (such as Twitter) and smaller operations (like Astrid) sport a sharp, clean and mostly gradient-free design that I personally feel pretty refreshing. I also really like the Google+ app, though I can’t say I use it all that much and I’m looking forward to the new Gmail app. If you need more evidence that Android apps can be just as good looking as their counterparts on other platforms, check out Android Niceties. Sharing between applications and services is also so much nicer and painless than on iOS, though there are some bad apples (I’m looking at you, Feedly).

There are a few quibbles I have about the Nexus 4, but they’re not major and definitely not show-stoppers. For starters, the back of the phone is glass, not plastic or metal. I don’t have a history of breaking screens, but I will sometimes put down my phone pretty roughly on a table and I’m afraid I’ll end up cracking the back soon. Secondly, the headphone jack is on top of the phone. This is probably a good idea if you’re charging and listening to music at the same time, but makes it’s a bit awkward for listening on earphones with the phone in your pocket. With the Nexus S (which had the jack at the bottom) it was quite natural to put the phone in your pocket bottom-up and then turn your hand as you pulled it out to see the screen upright. The corresponding motion with the jack on the bottom seems rather more convoluted, but it might just be muscle memory that will get reprogrammed with time. Finally, (and this isn’t unique to the Nexus 4) I’m yet to find a Android to-do or task management app that is flexible enough as OmniFocus on OS X and Android.

All that being said, I am very happy with the Nexus 4. I really liked the Nexus S when I first got it and I’ve always liked Android. The Nexus 4 is a significant upgrade and I pretty impressed by the current state of the Android ecosystem. Barring unforeseen problems (or a very cheap upgrade option) I fully expect to hold on to this as my primary mobile device for the next few years. I don’t have any experiences with other Android devices (or other smartphones for that matter) so I can’t really compare, but I’m willing to take a chance and say you can’t get much better than a clean stock Android (especially if you use Google services as much as I do). As a final happy ending, I managed to hand off my Nexus S to a friend who decided to move up from a dumb phone. That makes one less unused device for me to keep around.

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Shrutarshi Basu

Programmer, writer and engineer, currently working out of Cornell University in Ithaca, New York.

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