The Reading Revolution

The Web is in the middle of a reading and design revolution. And I’m not talking about the demise of the erstwhile <blink> tag. We’re seeing the rediscovery of the web as powerful document and knowledge transfer platform just as the Renaissance saw the rediscovery of Classical knowledge and wisdom. Independent of the rise of the online video and music people are also reading on the web, now more than ever. And there is no shortage of words, paragraphs, ideas and stories to read. Flexible web typography, the popularity of clean, elegant designs and the increasingly sophisticated rendering engines in modern browsers are helping to sustain and fuel our reading needs.

At the heart of this resurgence of reading are technologies that fundamentally change the experience of reading on the web. First on the list is Instapaper. The brainchild of Marco Arment (formerly of Tumblr) Instapaper is a web service and iOS application that is designed to one thing: make it possible and easy to save text content from the web and then present that text in a beautifully designed package. Instapaper strips out all forms of advertisement, images and anything else that distracts from the experience of just reading. To use Instapaper you sign up for an account and install the “Read Later” bookmarklet. When you find an article you want to save you just click on the “Read Later” button in your bookmarks bar and the entire text gets parsed and saved for later. There is no form to fill out and no need to set any options. You can get along really well with just the defaults.

 

Instapaper on the iPad
Instapaper on the iPad

 

Where Instapaper really shines is if you pair it with the iPhone or iPad app. These apps sync automatically to your account and download the full text of your saved articles. The articles are then presented in a no-distractions format on a clean background with beautiful fonts. Reading Instapaper articles on an iPad is one of the best reading experiences I’ve ever had, second only to the Kindle. Words and screenshots do not do the experience justice, you have to see it for yourself. If you read a lot of long-form web content it might be worth getting an iPad just for Instapaper.

But what if you want a better experience right now while you’re reading in your browser? Filling that niche is Readability — a bookmarklet backed by a web service that strips away all the fluff from a webpage and presents just the text (with any important inline images) for your reading pleasure. Like Instapaper the reading experience is carefully tuned with a good selection of beautiful fonts set on clean, neutral backgrounds. You can also get along just fine with the defaults but have some options for customizing your experience if you want (mainly font size/type and background color).

Personally, I think Readability is a more important innovation than Instapaper. While Instapaper works best with a reading device like an iPad, Readability works on mostly anything that’s text-heavy on the web. Not only does it get bad design and unwanted ads out of the way, it’s also great for sites that are have font that is just a little too small, or columns that are just a little too narrow for comfortable reading on a wide screen. Personally I find myself reaching for Readability on anything that I find even slightly difficult to read. After all, it’s right there in my browser and takes barely a few seconds to beautify a page.

Readability on the web
Readability on the web

Alongside the aesthetic fixes, Readability also has a business model for sustaining ad-free reading on the web. 70% of the monthly $5 (or more if you like) fee gets sent to the content providers. For the individual reader, $5 a month is a tiny price to pay for a great reading experience. Multiply that by hundreds of thousands (millions?) and you get a business model that doesn’t depend exclusively on selling consumer information.

Both Instapaper and Readability (and similar apps like Reeder and Tweetmag) build on a set of basic principles to offer great, compelling products. They acknowledge that people like, and will pay for, thoughtfully designed and beautiful tools. Instead of trying to offer services for “free” and turning their users into products they tighten the loop between producers and consumers both in terms of product and financing. In the process they do what I would consider a public good: making the acquisition and production of knowledge a pleasurable, worthwhile experience.

We’re living in the years of the resurgence of the web as a communication and knowledge platform, rather than just an ad delivery vehicle. While video, music, animations and visualizations are making the web a more dynamic and vibrant environment, tools like Instapaper and Readability are ensuring the existence and growth of a web “designed for reading, not a web where reading happens despite the design“. And I for one like it that way.

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Published by

Shrutarshi Basu

Programmer, writer and engineer, currently working out of Cornell University in Ithaca, New York.

3 thoughts on “The Reading Revolution”

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