Showing up and making rituals

Over the last few months I have been suffering from some bouts of senioritis. Nothing fatal, but it’s set me back by a few weeks, especially for my long-term projects like my thesis. At the same time, I’ve come to realize that every semester I start off with some grand plans but I just get too busy at the end of it to accomplish. Part of it is just being an engineering and computer science double major, but a large portion is also a flawed personal work ethic.

Though I make jokes about my laziness all the time, I do try my best to get stuff done. Unfortunately I’ve never managed to set up and stick to a formal plan of action. Most of the time I’ll implement a system or just put in more hours when I hit a heavy workload, but then I’ll stop once the busy period ends. That serves to get me through the hard times without affecting my grades (or making me pull regular all-nighters) but it also means that I end up wasting a lot of time and not working to my full potential during regular workloads.

I’ve been wanting to fix this situation for a while, but never figured out how. I use a to-do manager regularly and that helps to keep track of tasks that must be done on time. But it doesn’t help me make good use of the time that isn’t directly scheduled. Also I don’t want to block schedule all my time and live tied to my calendar and to-do list. I want my schedule to have some flexibility and variety, but not enough to cause choice paralysis.

I found the beginnings of a solution about a week ago, but I only formulated it on Monday. I read an article about forming rituals — things you do every day without thinking because doing it will help you reach a goal. The author uses the example of exercise — it’s something you just need to do every day without thinking. If you stop to think you’ll start coming up with reasons not to go to the gym. So what were my rituals? I realized that I didn’t really have any. I was working on a reactionary basis, reacting to homework and assignments and exams instead of getting work done every day — work that I enjoyed and really wanted to do.

I’ve decided to implement some rituals, but in a looser sense. I know that I can get classwork done on time because somehow I manage to make the time, but my other activities fall by the side. There are 3 main activities I enjoy but don’t do as much as I would like to — reading, writing and programming. So my rituals are that every day I will:

  1. Spend 30 minutes reading fiction. For now it’s classics on my Kindle right before bed time and then books from the library once I’ve exhausted that list.
  2. Spend 30 minutes reading non-fiction. This list gets fed by RSS feeds and links coming in via tweets. The actual reading will be either in Google Reader or in Instapaper.
  3. Write one complete piece. This will be a blog post (for The ByteBaker or the Lafayette Voices), a subsection for my thesis, or homework for screenwriting class.
  4. Write some code. Either something for my thesis or my computational art project. I’m hesitant to quantify this as I don’t know how. Definitely something to think about and come back to in a week or two.

All this does add to the amount of stuff I need to get done each day, but that’s the point. Till now, I’d be lucky to get two of the above done each day. I need to do all four in order to be the person I wanted to become (a well-read hacker with great communication skills).

To get the time to do everything I’ll be cutting down on the time I spend on email and randomly browsing the web. Anything interesting I want to read gets buffered in Instapaper for reading as part of the 30-minute non-fiction block. Hopefully I’ll completely eliminate the time wasted sitting around and wondering what to do (and the frustration that entails). But at the same time the rituals are flexible enough that I’m not strait-jacketed. The point is to show up and take away the randomness that might prevent me from getting things done. Will it work? I’ll find out soon enough.

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Shrutarshi Basu

Programmer, writer and engineer, currently working out of Cornell University in Ithaca, New York.

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