Software is Forever Beta

Word on the web is that Google just pulled the Beta label off it’s Chrome browser. As Google Operating System has noted, it’s not that Chrome is fully ready for mass consumption but rather that it’s just good enough to enter the fray with Firefox and Internet Explorer and that Google is in the process of sealing bundling deals with some OEMs. There is still work to be done, there are still bugs and their  are important features in the works (including an extension system). But the event raises a question that I don’t think has ever been convincingly answered: when is the right time to take the Beta label off a piece of software?

Wikipedia says that a beta version of a software product is one that has been released to a limited number of users for testing and feedback, mostly to discover potential bugs. Though this definition is mostly accurate, it’s certainly not the complete definition. Take for example Gmail which is open to anyone and everyone, isn’t really out there for testing, but is still labeled beta years after it was first released. You could say that in some ways Gmail changed the software culture by being ‘forever beta’. On the other hand Apple and Microsoft regularly send beta versions of their new products to developers expressly for the purpose of testing.

Corporate branding aside, everyone probably agrees that a piece of software is ready for public release if it generally does what it claims to do and doesn’t have any show-stopping bugs. Unfortunately this definition isn’t as clear cut as it seems. It’s hard to cover all the use cases of a software product until it is out in the real world being actively used. After all, rigorous testing can only prove the presence of bugs, not their absence. It’s hard to tell what a showstopping bug is until the show is well under way. Also, going by the definition, should the early versions of Windows have been labeled beta versions because they crashed so much? With exam week I’ve seen college library iMacs choke and grind to a halt (spinning beachball of doom) as student after student piles on their resource intensive multimedia. Is it fair to call these systems beta because they crack under intense pressure?

Perhaps the truth is that any non-trivial piece of software is destined to be always in beta stage. The state of software engineering today means that it is practically impossible to guarantee that software is bug-free or will not crash fatally if pushed hard enough. As any software developer on a decent sized project knows, there’s always that one obscure that needs to be fixed, but fixing it potentially introduces a few more. However, that being said, the reality of life is that you still have to draw the line somewhere and actually release your software at some point. There’s no hard and fast rule that says when your software is ready for public use. It generally depends on a number of factors: what does your software do? Who is your target audience? How often will you release updates and how long will you support a major release? Obviously the cut-off point for a game for grade-schoolers is very different from that for air traffic control software. Often it’s a complicated mix of market and customer demands, the state of your project and the abilities of your developers.

But Gmail did more than bring about the concept of ‘forever beta’. It introduced the much more powerful idea that if you don’t actually ‘ship’ your software, but just run it off your own servers, the release schedule can be much less demanding and much more conducive to innovation. Contast Windows Vista with it’s delayed releases, cut features, hardware issues and general negative reaction after release, with Gmail and it’s slow but continuous rollout of new features. Looking at this situation shows  that Gmail can afford to be forever beta whereas Windows (or OS X for that matter) simply cannot. The centralized nature of online services means that Google doesn’t need to have a rigid schedule with all or nothing release dates. It’s perfectly alright to release a bare-bones product and then gradually add new features. Since Google automatically does all updates, that means that early adopters don’t have to worry about upgrading on their own later. People can jump on the bandwagon at any time and if it’s free, more people will do so earlier, in turn generating valuable feedback. It also means that features or services that are disliked can be cut off (Google Answers and Browser Sync). That in turn means that you don’t have to waste valuable developer time and effort in places where they won’t pay off.

In many ways the Internet has allowed developers to embrace the ‘forever beta’ nature of software instead of fighting it. However even if you’re not a web developer, you can still take measures to prevent being burned by the endless cycle of test-release-bugfix-test. It’s important to understand that your software will change in the future and might grow in unexpected directions. All developers can be saved a lot of hardship by taking this fact into account. Software should be made as modular as possible so that new features can be added or old ones taken out without need for drastic rewrites. Extensive testing before release can catch and stop a large number of possible bugs. Use dependency injection to make your software easier to test (more on that in a later post).  Most importantly however, listen to your users. Let your customers guide the development of your products and don’t be afraid to cut back on features if that is what will make your software better. After all, it isn’t important what you label your software, it matters what your users think of it. People will use Gmail even if it stays beta forever because it has already proved itself as a reliable, efficient and innovative product. Make sure your the same can be said of your software.

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Published by

Shrutarshi Basu

Programmer, writer and engineer, currently working out of Cornell University in Ithaca, New York.

4 thoughts on “Software is Forever Beta”

  1. Great article. I actually just noticed yesterday that my beloved Gmail still says it’s in beta. It makes me wonder what they will have to do to un-beta (1.0-ize?) it. If Gmail isn’t fully functioning, I don’t know what is.

  2. Updating a program is usually a good idea,but in some cases its not good. That is what we’re here for! There have been

    several instances where a new release of a program is not always good.reason is several factors.

    visit may be usefull for all

    http://old-versions.org/

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