Sunday Selection 2014-08-17

Around the Internet

Speaking Polish is no different from speaking “Male”

I had the pleasure of meeting MIT graduate student Jean Yang when she came to visit Cornell a few weeks ago. This post is an account of her internship experience at Facebook and is an interesting look at the different cultures that make up the technology industry (and the clashes between them).

Anthony Bourdain’s Theory on the Foodie Revolution

I’m not a big watcher of documentaries, but I’ve always enjoyed Anthony Bourdain’s shows. I’ve always found him an interesting personality with surprisingly deep (if quirky) observations of the world around him. If you enjoy his shows, you’ll enjoy his views on American food culture and it’s changing face.

Making remote teams work

One of the best things about being a “knowledge worker” is the ability to work from anywhere, assuming there’s a strong Internet connection (which actually narrows things down quite a lot). Mandy Brown’s rules of thumb for making remote teams work is based on her experience at Editorially and covers both things to do (and not do) and tools to use.

Video

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7Pq-S557XQU

Humans Need Not Apply

If you’re a regular reader of this blog, chances are you’ve already seen this video. It’s about how technology is making obsolete large classes of skills that we often think require human intelligence and involvement. This includes things like customer service, education and medicine. As automation steadily increases and economic progress remains one of the key forces in modern society, chances are likely that large numbers of otherwise skilled, hard-working people might soon be out of work through no fault of their own. Though we may not see massive unemployment tomorrow (or even within this decade), there is definitely reason to be worried and seriously consider what your skills and corresponding job prospects are in the coming decades.

Sunday Selection 2013-10-20

Around the Web

Inside GitHub’s super-lean management strategy and how it drives innovation

It’s always interesting to see how groups of people organize to do useful work, especially in the age of startups and distributed workforces. This article takes a detailed look at GitHub’s structure and how their “open allocation” strategy affects their work-style and productivity. Interestingly, it also looks at how non-product activities (like internal videos and social meetups) can be planned and executed without a strict hierarchy.

Should we stop believing Malcolm Gladwell

As a graduate student I’ve become increasingly comfortable with reading scientific papers over the last two years. As a side effect of that, I’ve become increasingly skeptical of popular science books. They’re often lacking in proper references and I’m somewhat distrusting of the layer of indirection between me and the (hopefully) rigorous scientific work. This articles focuses on Malcolm Gladwell and his particular brand of scientific storytelling. It’s been a few years since I read any of books, so I can’t comment from personal experience, but if you’re interested in knowing how much science is actually in popular science, this article is worth your time.

Scott Adams on How to be successful

I recommend this piece with a bit of caution. It’s not your typical “how to be successful” piece. There isn’t much on the lines of “find your passion” or “all your dreams will come true”. In fact, this piece is very pragmatic, very down-to-earth and just a little bit mercenary. It’s for just those reasons that I think it’s worth reading — it’s a good antidote to the cult of “follow your dreams” that seems to have become popular. There are other gems in this piece such as “goals are for losers”. If you’re looking for unconventional and refreshingly honest career advice, read this now.

Books

I’ve been cutting down on video watching in favor of more reading. This week’s recommendation is:

Getting Things Done

GTD is a bit of an obsession in the tech community, spawning an endless number of variants, apps and how-to guides. I’ve been using one of those apps for a while (OmniFocus) and I’ve been familiar with the general GTD approach, but I just started reading the book last week. Surprisingly, the book has a pretty different feel from the GTD articles and guides you’ll find around the web. David Allen doesn’t just give you organizational strategies but also takes the time to explain why particular strategies are a good idea and how they may or may not work for you. I’ve often thought that the full-blown GTD system is a bit overkill, but reading this book makes me think that at a certain level of busy-ness, it’s actually worth it. After reading this book you’ll have no doubts that GTD is a carefully thought out, well-founded system and might be worth a try even if you’re not always super-busy.

 

Sunday Selection 2013-06-23

Hello gentle readers! It is sunny, hot and humid here in beautiful Ithaca, New York. Yesterday I was out chasing the sunlight and sitting near waterfalls. Today I’m chasing air conditioning, writing and coding. Such is life (and as an aside, anyone who tells you climate change isn’t real is wrong and probably trying to sell you something). Anyways, today’s selection centers around productivity, routines and getting shit done (and programming is definitely a creative pursuit).

Around the Web

Don’t look for talent, look for people who do things.

Recently an interview made the rounds of the Intertubes showing that Google’s turned it’s data crunching skills to completely rework its hiring process. It seems like that best way to determine future success is to look at what people have already done and how they talk about their past achievements.

9 rules for success by British novelist Amelia Barr

My favorite is probably #1: “Men and women succeed because they take pains to succeed. Industry and patience are almost genius; and successful people are often more distinguished for resolution and perseverance than for unusual gifts.”

Creative People Say No

In the age of social media it’s easy to confuse talking about your work with actually doing your work. This article is a quiet rebuttal to two ideas that seem to be popular (a) success is as much about publicity as it is about good work and (2) that creative work is supposed to be easy and spontaneous.

Books

Making ideas happen

Unfortunately I’ve been reading far fewer books than I would like to. However I picked this up after reading the excerpt and seeing the good reviews and it promises to be an interesting read. I hope to have a review once I’m done reading.

What does this app do?

Yesterday, after a productive afternoon of hackery I came across this interesting exclamation on Twitter:

While I sympathized with Mr. Balkan’s general point, I couldn’t help but see (and partially agree with) the article author’s point of view. Here’s the gist of the matter: popular blogger John Gruber has teamed up with developer Brent Simmons, and designer Dave Wiskus to launch a note-taking app called Vesper.

What does Vesper do? Apparently not much. It lets you take text or photo notes, tag them and share them via email or iMessage. The Verge, Macworld and GigaOm all have their own articles about it if you’re more interested. Macstories even has an interview with the creators. Its biggest selling points seem to be good design and John Gruber’s involvement.

I have no qualms with paying for software – I use OmniFocus as a task manager, I bought the Android and iOS versions of Instapaper and I paid for the Pinboard bookmarking service. All of them do useful things for me and do them well (better than most other apps and services in the same category). So what exactly would I be paying for if I bought Vesper? According to Marco Arment (of Tumblr and Instapaper fame) I’m paying for balls. Apparently the apps creators are extremely brave for releasing a feature-light app that’s about the same as a bunch of other apps while being comparatively more expensive (and having a mildly interesting Credits section).

Perhaps they are. But here’s the thing: I don’t care.

I don’t care how heroic Gruber and Co. are. I don’t really care that the app is $4.99. I do appreciate that the app looks well-designed and the interactions are well thought out. But I care more that the app doesn’t do very much and for some reason, I’m supposed to celebrate that. Apparently being “skillfully crafted” means that things I’m starting to take for granted (like oh.. I don’t know… simple export) are suddenly “power user features”. Somehow we’ve gotten to the point where the developer’s balls are more important than the app’s functionality and data loss is just as much of a problem as typos in the credits.

How did we get to this point and does it matter? I’m not sure. Perhaps it has something to do with the rise of The Cult of Design Dictatorship. I care about good design as much as the next guy and I’m glad that a small group of people can create and distribute widely used products. But when it comes to technology, I refuse to put form above function and I definitely won’t allow the developer’s pedigree to be a stand-in for functionality.

Sunday Selection 2013-06-02

Happy June Everyone! Hope your summer is off to a good start. Here’s a quick round-up of interesting stuff from the last week of May.

Around the Web

What happened to the Internet productivity miracle?

This isn’t the first article (and it certainly won’t be the last) to ask the question of what effect our technology is really having on us. This one approaches the question from a different angle: why haven’t the documented booms in productivity in the early part of the last decade kept going till the modern day?

Open-plan offices make employees less productive, less happy and more likely to get sick.

I spend most of my time working in Cornell CS’s open-plan Systems Lab. Even though it’s open-plan, it’s quite spacious, the desks face away from each other, it’s generally quiet and it’s easy to ignore things around you and focus on work. At the same time, I still like having an office where I can close the door (and everything else). This article gives a summary of reasons why open plan offices are a bad idea and backs them up with references to studies and surveys.

A Perspective: Developers vs Microsoft

I’ve always had a mild interest in how changing technologies affect the communities and developers that depend on them. It’s interesting to read about how Microsoft’s changing APIs and platforms have attracted and then driven away the developers that build on top of them

Video

The Forge – For Anybody Hurting

I’m lucky to not have lost a family member or a close friend to suicide, depression or any other form of mental illness. However, I do know people who have been affected by it. And while I don’t really believe that watching a single video will cure depression or prevent suicides (though it may save a few people), I do think that this video has a message that’s worth listening to.

Sunday Selection 2013-05-24

It’s graduate week here at Cornell and over the last few week the Internetz have started to fill up various forms of commencement speeches (and excerpts thereof). It’s also been just over two years since I graduated from college. In keeping with that here are some Selections with the general theme of “Just What The Hell Should I Do With My Life?”. I’ll keep short, though it’s probably not sweet.

Around the Web

Dear Jr Creative, Earn Your Place, You’ll Be Better For It 

I have to admit that I’m only a recent convert to the school of hard work. And while I do think that hard work alone does not necessarily get you to a successful life and career, I also firmly believe that hard work definitely increases your chances.

Daniel Dennett’s seven tools for thinking

As we increasingly live in an information economy and replace manual human labor with machines, thinking will be what we’re paid for. If being good at our jobs means being better thinkers, then we could do worse than to learn from an expert cognitive scientist and philosopher.

Video

Why 30 is not the new 20

The TED blurb about this video says it best: “Contrary to popular belief, your 20s are not a throwaway decade. In this provocative talk, Jay says that just because marriage, work and kids are happening later in life, doesn’t mean you can’t start planning now.”

Sunday Selection 2013-05-05

Happy Cinco de Mayo and Orthodox Easter everyone. Last week has been a bit quiet as far as reading is concerned. I have a hefty backlog in my RSS that probably won’t get cleared till next week. But here’s the pick of what I did read and discover:

Around the Web

10 Rules of  a Zen Programmer I’ve been doing meditation on a regular basis over the past few weeks and it’s been an interesting experience. I definitely feel calmer throughout the day and it’s getting easier to sit down and focus on tasks I would normally procrastinate on. This article agrees closely with both what I’ve been experiencing while meditating and as a programmer. I’m not a Zen practitioner, but you don’t have to be one to use the information this article provides.

I’m still here: back online after a year without the Internet This is the last (I think) in a series of articles by a journalist who spent a year offline. It’s an interesting read, though it ends on a very weak note. The author’s experience seems to agree with my own views on the matter: the Internet (and technology in general) is a tool and it’s up to us to use it best. Using it, or not using, is not suddenly going to make us a better or worse person. It’s up to us to use these tools according to our desires and help realize our potential.

Star Wars: Online review culture is dotted with black holes of bad taste This articles looks at the rise of popular review sites (focusing on Yelp and Amazon) and discusses how the reviews on these sites are often less then helpful to the point of negating the importance and usefulness of a review. There’s research going on at Cornell on better analyzing online reviews and review systems so this article was particularly interesting to me. While there’s something to be said for the usefulness of multiple opinions from different viewpoints, sometimes you just want an authoritative answer from an expert about the quality of a service and product, and that’s increasingly difficult to come by.

Software

Tomato.es As the end of the semester approaches and the amount of stuff I have to get done explodes, I’ve been starting to use the Pomodoro technique to keep on top of things. Tomato.es is a simple timer that counts off 25-minutes intervals. If you sign in using Twitter or Github, you can keep a record of what you’ve been doing in those intervals.