Process and Product

Yesterday I came across a post entitled “default behavior” by Ben Augarten about how important it is to put your products out in the world. It starts with him talking about how the code he’s writing is for an internal tool and hence will never see the light of day. Few people will use it and he’ll lose ownership of it once his internship ends. He implores programmers to release their code as products into the world and seems more than a little disdainful of programmers who don’t release their own products. He seems to be under the impression that if you’re not working on your very product that you’re dead inside.

He’s wrong.

It’s great to love to your product. It’s great to build something, to show it to the world, to have people use it, get feedback and make it better. If that’s what motivates you and makes you happy then by all means go ahead and release products. Life is too short to be unhappy (though people are working on that). What it doesn’t mean is that not releasing products makes you unhappy.

There’s a distinction to be made between process and product. Product is the fruit of your labor, process is the labor itself. In the rush to create startups, launch products, have dozens of repos on your Github account, we tend to lose sight of the process itself.

While I certainly understand (and have felt) the allure of releasing a product, there’s a lot of joy to be gained in the process itself. While many of us got into computers and programming because of the things we could create, many of us (including myself) got into it because of the joy of coding itself. I love learning new technologies, working through problems, crafting solutions. I love the mental strain of thinking my way to answer, I love the physical feel of my fingers on a keyboard and the seeing the characters of the screen. I love the process of seeing something being created as much I like the feeling of having created something. The same goes for writing or drawing or cooking – how you make something is just as important as what you make.

I suspect that this joy for the process itself is why so many incredibly talented and hardworking people are happy working for closed source companies (financial and material renumeration aside). If you are fulfilled by the labor itself then you care less about the fruits of your labor. This isn’t particularly new thinking – it predates open source, computers, software, even modern science and technology. As far as I know, the earliest well-known expression of such a notion is from the Bhagavad Gita where the god Krishna tells Prince Arjun:

“To action alone hast thou a right and never at all to its fruits; let not the fruits of action be thy motive; neither let there be in thee any attachment to inaction”

I don’t entirely agree with this: I do believe in property rights and I think that as a creator you deserve some say in how your creation is used. However I do agree with the underlying idea that you can find motivation in the actions themselves and not just their results. Getting too invested in the result can detract from joy you recieve from the process (and vice-versa). I’m not going to claim that process is better or more meaningful than product. Humans and their motivations and emotions are far more complex than such simple comparisons. But I am going to claim that finding fulfillment in the process itself is a perfectly valid way of living your life.

It’s great that Ben and so many other programmers and entrepreneurs want to create products and see them in action. We need that. They don’t have to become process-oriented. But they do have to understand that not all people will value products as much as they do and they have to respect that. Sometimes the journey is more important than the destination.

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3 thoughts on “Process and Product

  1. My point is not process versus product but instead the means by which you initiate the process. At least once, a programmer should take his or her own idea from conception through the process and release it into the world. It is a valuable process. I love the joy of coding, but I love it more when I’m coding my own ideas and creations, not the guy in the office upstairs.

    Well written though, I enjoyed reading it. I’ll have to come back more often.

    1. I completely agree that you should love your own creations and preserve your own creative spirit and endeavors. But having your own intentions aligned with that of a boss, institution or large company can be very productive and fulfilling even if there’s less external visibility.

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