Hundreds of Little Things

Last week I came across a blog post about the new release of an image editor called Acorn. I don’t use Acorn, but one part of the post appealed to me. In a section titled “Hundred of Little Things” the author talked about fixing bugs in Acorn:

It took months and months of work, it was super boring and mind numbing and it was really hard to justify, and it made Acorn 5 super late. But we did it anyway, because something in us felt that software quality has been going downhill in general, and we sure as heck weren’t going to let that happen to Acorn.

Most of my past week was fixing lots of small and annoying little bugs in my summer project. Some of them were edge cases in the core functionality of the system, but a lot of them were little bits and pieces and rough edges that I would have normally just let pass. I do agree that software quality seems to be going downhill in general. One way to fix it is to pay attention to all the little things that we usually let slip past. On a related note, I think that writing software in a way that doesn’t allow these little things to slip past us is still unnecessarily difficult and complicated, but that’s a matter for another post.

Sunday Selection 2015-08-16

Around the Web

Mad as Hell: How a Generation Came of Age While Listening to John Stewart

Last week marked John Stewart’s last week on The Daily Show. I enjoyed his last few episodes, but part of me was really wishing that his last show would include a takedown of the Republican debate. This isn’t the most in-depth post about his years at The Daily Show, but I think it captures effectively how many people of my age feel about John Stewart and the show.

Meditation vs medication: A Comic Essay on Faciing Depression

I’ve meditating more regularly in recent months as well as reading more about meditation, mindfulness and Buddhist philosophy in general. At the same time, depression is a growing concern, especially among people involved in technology and for me personally as well. I’ve also come to realize that there is a certain taboo surrounding anti-depressants: a latent fear that medication will fundamentally change who we are. I don’t think any one article can completely tackle this complicated bundle of issues, but this is a good place to start.

Programming Sucks

If you’ve ever wondered what the day-to-day life of a programmer is like, or the state of our technology is, this post gives a only half-joking look at behind the digital scenes. If you lived in the trenches yourself, you will find yourself nodding along, and maybe shedding a tear or two. There should probably be a trigger warning associated with this article.

From the Bookshelf

Radical Acceptance by Tara Brach

Talking of meditation, my most recent foray into that world came in the form of this book. It’s not about meditation per se, but rather involves using meditation as a tool to become more comfortable with our lives, face our inner demons, and accept the way things are as a focal point for living a better life. The book is replete with personal stories from the author’s life (and those of her patients) and includes helpful guided meditations to get you started.

Video

Forging the Hattori Hanzo Katana

I’ve always had a fascination with Japanese culture and martial arts, and Hattori Hanzo’s monologue is probably my favorite part of the Kill BIll movie. The movie doesn’t actually show you how the sword is forged, so here is a video that does. The narration could have been better, but it’s still a very entertaining (and educational) video.

Quick Notes on the OnePlus One

I’ve been a happy owner and user of a Nexus 4 for about two years (and the Nexus S before that), but in the last few months, my phone was starting to show its age. I was barely getting a full day’s usage out of the battery and after the Lollipop updates, things seemed generally more sluggish in general. It was time for an update, and following my usual habit of a skipping at least a generation when it comes to tech, I was really hoping to get a Nexus 6. Unfortunately, the $650+ price point placed it more than a little out of my reach. I’ve never owned a non-Nexus smartphone, but it seemed like it was finally time to move on to something else.

There’s been a lot of hype and news about the OnePlus One that I won’t bother recapping here. In short, the OnePlus One is a reasonably priced, state-of-the-art Android smartphone that comes unlocked and runs a version of the CyanogenMod ROM. It’s not stock Android like the Nexus line, but there’s no bloatware either and it works just fine with the full suite of Google Apps and (as far as I can tell) most popular Android apps in general. After being invite only for several months, you can now buy one from the OnePlus website, but only on Tuesdays. I’ve had mine for about two weeks now and thoroughly enjoy it. Yesterday a friend of mine asked me about my experiences about the device. I thought I’d collect all the points I made in that conversation and share them here.

For starters, I really like the device. It’s much snappier as compared to my Nexus 4, the large screen is gorgeous and the design in general is well executed. I got the 64GB “Black Sandstone” version. As the name suggests, the back of the phone has a black, sandstone-like texture that makes the device quite pleasant to hold. Time will tell if the texture holds up with daily wear and tear. The battery life is really good—I can easily get almost two days of moderate use on a full charge, and well over a day even with heavy usage. It’s really nice to know that I have a good few hours of usage left even if I forget to plug it in overnight.

I was a little concerned about the large 5.5″ screen, which is pretty massive compared to smartphone screens I’m used to. However, after a few weeks, I’ve gotten used to it and it feels really comfortable to use on a daily basis. By and large, I can use it with one hand (even for input using the swipe keyboard), but it is definitely easier to use with two hands. In fact, the device is light and slim enough that compared to my Nexus 4, it actually feels lighter and less of a burden to carry around. I do a lot of reading on my iPad Air (RSS, websites and Instapaper) but I’ve barely used it over the last two weeks. I’ve been testing out the One as a tablet replacement, at least for format-independent reading, and it’s been working out quite well so far.

I only have two main gripes about the One. First the CyanogenMod ROM that it’s using is still based on KitKat and I got used to Lollipop on the Nexus 4. But in all fairness, there’s nothing I seriously miss or can’t live without. And there’s a Lollipop-based ROM in the works. Second, the swipe keyboard seems noticeably less accurate than what I’ve gotten used to. However, that might just be because I still have the muscle memory of using the swipe keyboard on a smaller phone.

In summary, I think the OnePlus One is currently the best option for an unlocked, reasonably priced smartphone, especially given how expensive the Nexus 6 is.

Sunday Selection 2015-02-22

Around the Web

Oliver Sacks on Learning He Has Terminal Cancer

There is said to be a Roman tradition where a victorious Roman general would parade through the streets of Rome and as he did so a servant would whisper in his ear: Respice post te! Hominem te esse memento! Memento mori!”—“Look behind you! Remember that you are but a man! Remember that you will die!” We don’t have Roman generals parading through the streets anymore, but we do have talented writers reflecting on their impending deaths in the context of their lives.

My Prescribed Life

While the anti-vaccination “movement” has gotten a lot of press recently, there are other kinds of drugs administered to children that can significantly impact their lives. This piece traces the author’s use of anti-depressants from a young age and discusses how it affected her life and her growth as a person.

Squid can recode their genetic make-up on-the-fly

From the “truth is stranger than fiction” section: “A new study showcases the first example of an animal editing its own genetic makeup on-the-fly to modify most of its proteins, enabling adjustments to its immediate surroundings.”

From the Bookshelf

The Defining Decade

As someone approaching the tail end of their twenties, a book with the tagline “Why your twenties matter and how to make the most of them now” sounds like something I should have read five years ago. Oh well, better late than never I suppose. In this book, psychologist Dr. Meg Jay explores psychology, neuroscience, sociology and economics to make a compelling case for why the twenties can be an important time for growth and development and explains how the choices made (or not made) then can affect the rest of our lives. She combines personal anecdotes, interviews with numerous twenty-somethings and a host of solid evidence to write a narrative that is often hopeful, sometimes scary, but always compelling.

Video

BlackBerry 10 OS Vintage QNX Demo Floppy

I spent the better part of an hour today learning about QNX—a real-time operating system first developed in the 80s  that sports a practical microkernel architecture, a POSIX API and forms the core of a multitude of high-availability software (including the BlackBerry 10 OS, various car software and runs Cisco IOS devices). Best of all, it fits on an old-school floppy disk, complete with GUI and a web browser. QNX represents a great technical achievement and an interesting part of computer history.

Snap windows to screen edges in OS X

I’ve been a fan of tiling window managers for a while now (especially XMonad which I’ve been using for years). But recently I started using Windows 7 again for the first time in years. Windows doesn’t have a tiling window manager per se, but if you drag a window to the left or right edge of the screen, it expands it to take up that half of the screen. Soon I realized that I mostly only need two windows open side-by-side (usually code and docs, or code and a terminal) and for that use case Windows’ snap-to-edges window management usually does the trick.

I’m still using a mix of OS X and Linux at home and I’ve been using the default OS X window manager so far. I have my Macbook Air connected to a larger external monitor which reduces the need to be careful with screen real estate. I didn’t really care about having a tiling window manager for OS X, but I was curious about having some kind of snap-to-edge functionality.

It turns out that OS X doesn’t come with anything of the sort out of the box, but there is a free utility that provides the needed functionality. BetterTouchTool is actually a very feature-packed program that provides a lot of control over mouse and trackpad input and window management. One feature that works out of the box is snap-to-edge support. Here’s a simple tutorial that shows you exactly what to do (it basically amounts to installing the tool and enabling it). And now you can snap windows to edges as much as your heart desires.

Remembering Aaron Swartz

Aaron Swartz was a programmer, entrepreneur and Internet activist who left his mark on both the Internet and the world at large. He was involved in the development of the RSS and Markdown formats as well as the Creative Commons. He was also the founder of Demand Progress which was involved in the effort to stop SOPA/PIPA.

Just over two years ago Aaron killed himself in the middle of a federal prosecution. If he had lived, Aaron would probably have become one of the leading technologists or political figures of our generation. Unfortunately, two years after his death, there is too much pain and suffering in the world today for the media (or the Internet in general) to remember his suicide. The only article about his death that caught my eye was a Boing Boing piece entitled “How to honor Aaron Swartz’s life”. The piece is written by one of Aaron’s friends and is best summarized as a short guide to honoring Aaron life by living your own better.

To summarize the summary:

  1. Stay curious
  2. Don’t accept things as they are, or assume they’re that way for a good reason
  3. Become good at something. And then use it to make a difference.
  4. Ask yourself what you could do to make the biggest difference in the world.
  5. Stay alive.

For me, one of the best lessons from the article was the ending paragraph:

Don’t be surprised if at some point in your life, maybe at many points, you find yourself submerged in a darkness that seems infinite and eternal. It might seem to you like it’s always been that way, it will be always be that way and there’s only one way out. You’re wrong. It will get better. But it will only get better if you find some way to survive.

Aaron might be gone, but much of his work is still with us, in terms of code, organizations, and words. His website is still online (hopefully it will stay that way indefinitely) and so is his writing. I remember reading much of his writing around the time of his death and found it both interesting and a joy to read. His series on thinking and living better — Raw Nerve — is a good place to start.

Sunday Selection 2014-11-09

Around the Internet

Molly Crabapple’s 14 rules for creative success in the Internet age

I don’t identify as a “creative” (I far prefer “engineer”), but I firmly believe that artistic and creative endeavors need to be balanced by economic utility. Molly Crabapple is quickly becoming one of my favorite people on the Internet and her no-bullshit take on selling art is one of the best things I read this week.

I had a couple drinks and woke up with 1000 nerds

“Alternative” social networks seem to be all the rage nowadays (I’m looking at you, Ello). Tilde.club is just about as alternative as they come, though the author insists it’s not a social network. If you long for the days when men were men and wrote their own device drivers, then this might brighten your day a little.

Old Masters at the Top of Their Game

Retirement is so 20th Century. I’m going to make the completely unsubstantiated claim that changing economic situations are making retirement a thing of the past, but that doesn’t have to a bad thing. For some people, “work/life balance” simply doesn’t apply.

Books

10% Happier: How I Tamed the Voice in My Head, Reduced Stress Without Losing My Edge, and Found Self-Help That Actually Works

I’ve already praised the merits of this book at length. I tore through it in a day and it made me much more serious about my meditation practice.

Video

Nope, no video, just this neat GIF. It’s called Coffee O’Clock. You’re welcome.

Coffee O'Clock by RADIO
Coffee O’Clock by RADIO